6 Reasons Why Jesus and Paul Do NOT Use the Metaphor ‘Birth Pangs’ in the Same Way – Ep. 108

Pretribulational proponents believe that the beginning of birth pangs that Jesus mentions in his Olivet Discourse refers to when the day of the Lord’s wrath begins. Listen to find out how Paul and Jesus use the birthing metaphor in different ways.

In an attempt to make the “beginning of birth pangs” in Matthew 24:8 describe the day of the Lord’s wrath, pretribulationists assert that this is parallel with Paul’s usage of “birth pangs” in 1 Thessalonians 5:3, which clearly refers to the beginning of God’s wrath. However, beneath this surface-level reading, the respective contexts show that Jesus and Paul are not describing the same event, but actually opposite events. The metaphor “birth pangs” is not a technical phrase to denote the day of the Lord as some wrongly claim. Context, not mere usage, must determine the application of birth pangs.

There are six differences that demonstrate that Jesus and Paul are using it for opposite purposes:

1. Jesus’ usage in Matthew 24 occurs before the great tribulation; Paul’s usage is found at the inception of the day of the Lord. In other words, Jesus uses the birthing metaphor to warn that the end has not arrived (“Make sure that you are not alarmed, for this must happen, but the end is still to come. . . All these things are the beginning of birth pains”). Paul uses it to announce that the end has arrived (“then sudden destruction comes on them, like labor pains,” cf. Isa 13:7–8).

2. Accordingly, Jesus emphasizes the tolerable stage of “the beginning of birth pains” (Matt 24:8); hence, the reason he reassures, “Make sure that you are not alarmed, for this must happen, but the end is still to come” (Matt 24:6). In contrast, Paul is drawing from Isaiah’s labor imagery focused on the intolerable stage of actual giving birth, “cramps and pain seize hold of them like those of a woman who is straining to give birth” (Isa 13:8).

3. Jesus teaches that the “beginning of birth pangs” is what Christians are destined to experience (Matt 24:4–8); Paul teaches just the opposite that Christians are promised exemption from the hard labor pains, the time of God’s wrath (1 Thess 5:9).

4. The labor pains in Matthew 24 refer to natural events such as false christs, wars, famines, and earthquakes (Matt 24:5–8). Paul’s reference is to the supernatural event of the day of the Lord (2 Thess 1:5–8).

5. Jesus’ usage of the beginning of birth pangs occurs before the celestial disturbance happens (Matt 24:8–29). But in the Isaiah passage that Paul is drawing from associates the birth pangs of the onset of the day of the Lord with the celestial disturbance (Isaiah 13: 8–10).

6. Jesus uses the birthing metaphor to apply to both unbelievers and believers (Matt 24:5–8). While Paul uses it exclusively applied to unbelievers (1 Thess 5:3–4).

“All these are but the beginning of the birth pains.” (Matt 24:8)

“While people are saying, ‘There is peace and security,’ then sudden destruction will come upon them as labor pains come upon a pregnant woman, and they will not escape.” (1 Thess 5:3)

 

Links mentioned in the episode:

Jesus Parallels Paul on the Second Coming

 

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